Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Breed

Thinking of getting a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog and want to know if a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is suitable for your household?

Use the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog information on this website to learn more about adaptability, health issues, life span of Czechoslovakian Wolfdog and more.

Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Facts

  • Name: Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
  • Other Names: Slovak Wolfdog, Czech Wolfdog, Ceskoslovensky Vlcak
  • Origin: Czech Republic
  • Breed Group: Herding (UKC)
  • Breed Type: Cross Breed


Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Facts

Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Information

The spine is straight, strong in movement, with a short loin. The chest is large and flat rather than barrel-shaped. The belly is strong and drawn in. The back is short and slightly sloped; the tail is high set, and when freely lowered reaches the tarsi. The forelimbs are straight and narrow-set, with the paws slightly turned out, with a long radius and metacarpus. The hind limbs are muscular, with a long calf and instep. The coat color is yellow-grey to silver-grey, with a light mask. The hair is straight, close, and very thick. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a typical tenacious canterer; its movement is light and harmonious, and its stride is long.

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is more versatile than specialized. It is quick, lively, very active, and courageous. Distinct from the character of the Saarloos Wolfhound, shyness is a disqualifying fault in the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog develops a very strong social relationship - not only with their owner, but with the whole family. It can easily learn to live with other domestic animals which belong to the family; however, difficulties can occur in encounters with strange animals. It is vital to subdue the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog's passion for hunting when they are puppies to avoid aggressive behavior towards smaller animals as an adult. The puppy should never be isolated in the kennel; it must be socialized and get used to different surroundings. Female Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs tend to be more easily controllable, but both genders often experience a stormy adolescence. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is very playful, temperamental, and learns easily. However, it does not train spontaneously, the behavior of the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is strictly purposeful - it is necessary to find motivation for training.

What to do if you lose your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

If your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog or any other pet has gone missing and it does not have an identification tag with a phone number, you can:

1. List your missing pet details at Pet Reunite website here.

2. Report the missing pet on the Local Lost Pets Facebook Groups Here.

3. Phone the nearby vet clinics to see if anyone has handed in your lost pet.

4. Contact the RSPCA or Visit the RSPCA Lost Pets website and complete a Lost Pet Report.

5. Visit Lost Pets Pages of Animal Pounds.

What to do if you find a lost Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

If you find a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog or any other pet and it does not have an identification tag with a phone number, you can:

1. Register the found pet details at Pet Reunite website here.

2. Report the missing pet on the Local Facebook Lost Pets Groups.

3. Phone the Local Authority to collect the lost animal.

4. Take the animal to the local Animal Shelter near to your suburb.

5. Take the animal to the local Vet who usually scan the animal’s microchip and phone the registered pet owner.

Laws Regarding Missing Pets

1. It is against the law to keep any animal that you find.

2. Pets are generally considered property and it is illegal to take and keep someone else’s property.

3. You must call your local animal control unit and file a FOUND AN ANIMAL report for any dog or cat you find.

4. To reclaim your lost dog, cat or other pet from the animal shelter you must pay a release fee.

5. If your dog or cat is unregistered, you will have to register your pet before you can take it home.