East-European Shepherd Dog Breed

Thinking of getting an East-European Shepherd Dog and want to know if an East-European Shepherd is suitable for your household?

Use the East-European Shepherd information on this website to learn more about adaptability, health issues, life span of East-European Shepherd and more.

East-European Shepherd Facts

  • Name: East-European Shepherd
  • Other Names: Byelorussian Ovcharka, Vostochnoevropejskaya Ovcharka, VEO
  • Origin: Russia
  • Breed Group: None
  • Breed Type: Cross Breed


East-European Shepherd Dog Facts

East-European Shepherd Information

Their backs are straight, strong, wide, and long. They are 10-17% longer than their height at withers. The loins are long and wide, well-muscled and slightly arched. Their croup is wide, long, and slightly sloping towards the tail. The tail is long, bears thick fir, erected in a form of a sword when the dog's excited. The chest is moderately wide, while the belly is reasonably tucked up. The chests are scimitar in form, reaching the hocks or slightly longer in some cases. The legs are strong and straight; feet are oval and compact. The dog's pace is of a trotter, rather than of a skid, sliding just above the ground so typical to other German Shepherds' cousins.

The East European Shepherd is balanced, confident and intelligent. VEO is an attentive, active, self-assured dog that appears calm and quiet but constantly monitors situation and is ready to "turn on" on owner's command. The East European Shepherd has an active defensive reaction, distrusts strangers and can be aggressive when needed but under no circumstances it should be inclined to unmotivated aggression. VEOs excel as K9 and personal protection guard dogs or as companions. East European Shepherds are working dogs and need a regular exercise. They were bred for their intelligence and they are curious and quick learners. Their ability to withstand extreme climates allows them to live outside, as well as inside, in a house or an apartment. They perform well as hunting dogs and can work as draught dogs in a group of the same.

What to do if you lose your East-European Shepherd

If your East-European Shepherd Dog or any other pet has gone missing and it does not have an identification tag with a phone number, you can:

1. Register your missing pet details at Pet Reunite website here.

2. Report the lost pet on the Local Lost Pets Facebook Groups Here.

3. Phone the local vet clinics to see if anyone has brought in your lost pet.

4. Telephone the RSPCA or Visit the RSPCA Lost Pets website and complete a Lost Pet Report.

5. Visit Lost Pets Pages of Animal Pounds.

What to do if you find a lost East-European Shepherd

If you find a East-European Shepherd Dog or any other pet and it does not have an identification tag with a phone number, you can:

1. Report the found pet details at Pet Reunite website here.

2. Report the missing pet on the Local Facebook Lost Pets Groups.

3. Call the Local Council to collect the lost animal.

4. Take the pet to the local Animal Shelter near to your area.

5. Take the animal to the local Vet Clinic who can scan the animal’s microchip and locate the registered owner of the pet.

Laws Regarding Missing Pets

1. It is against the law to keep any animal that you find.

2. Pets are generally considered property and it is illegal to take and keep someone else’s property.

3. You must contact your local animal control unit and file a FOUND AN ANIMAL report for any dog or cat you find.

4. To reclaim your lost dog, cat or other pet from the animal shelter you must pay a release fee.

5. If your dog or cat is unregistered, you will have to register your pet before you can take it home.